Asian Americans showed throughout the chapters a series of improved changes in their response and resistance to social, political, and legal conditions. We have seen the changes taking place as we have read along in each chapter in their growth to rise upon the American society. For most of our early history in the United States, Asian Americans worked on farms and plantations on subsistence wages or as laborers. In the wake of Emancipation, certain tactics were used to try and keep Asian laborers under control. The stereotype of the Chinese laundromat came from historical anti-Chinese sentiment that excluded Chinese laborers from other forms of work. Chinese laundries became one of the few forms of work open to early Chinese migrants, but also came to be a way of targeting Chinese Americans with discriminatory laws based on race. Yick Wo, who owned a laundry with a legal license for years refused to close his laundry and pay a $10 fine was consequently imprisoned where he sued for a writ of habeas corpus and was victorious in winning his case under the 14th Amendment. His case was an initial start to “Response and Resistance” against discrimination for owning their own businesses and property as described in the book (pg. 152). Asian Americans responded to racism and discrimination by working on building ethnic resources and strengthening them by seeking legal assistance for their claims in demanding their rights in the legal system. Asian Americans went from being willing to work under many unlawful and poor conditions, to resisting and responding to the injustices and discrimination by legally taking action and turning to lawyers, brokers, or ethnic associations to help them appeal unfavorable decisions. Immigration became a problem when the increased in numbers of immigrants coming to the U.S. was at a high increase in the 1960’s with the “baby boom”. The exclusion of Asian immigrants like the Chinese and Japanese came in place bringing Asian immigrants to…

Asian American Movement