Question 1(5 marks)Over the past two decades we have seen a gradual shift from ‘control’ to ‘management’ to ‘support’ in how behaviour management is viewed. Provide a concise explanation of what is meant by these three terms as they relate to the education context. Keep in mind that ‘control’ does not necessarily mean autocratic and punitive behaviour and that all three approaches to behaviour management still have a place in education. To supplement your concise explanations, provide a practical example for each, relevant to your sector.(Word length: 300 words)(323)Provide your answer hereControl – The control approach requires the teacher to exhibit appropriate authority and control by establishing clear guidance (rules) in behaviour expectations and learning goals with consequences of not conforming or complying with these. Though, by controlling appropriate behaviour with recognition/ praise and unacceptable behaviour with unpleasant consequences, the contributing factor of why the student is misbehaving might be overlooked. In early childhood settings, I would use the “time out or 5 minute consequence rule” whereby if a child/children are not able (or want) to play nicely together, they are removed from the game for 5 minutes. This action will only work if they are firstly aware of the rule-consequence of “If you cannot share, you have to play on your own”.Management – The management approach requires the teacher to be a competent manager of the classroom environment. This is achieved by not only engaging the students in learning but also being capable in bringing them back on task when they drift off task or misbehave. Using visual reminders is not only helpful for the children but also for the teacher. In an early childhood classroom, visual reminders can provide students with a senseof security as they learn behavioral and social expectations. Visual reminders can be used to assist students in learning and following:…

supportive learning environments